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Narcissistic parents can make custody decisions seem impossible

Going through divorce can be tough under any circumstances. Of course, certain details of a particular situation could make the process seem even more daunting. When children are involved, many California parents may want to make the best custody decisions possible and in a timely manner. However, if one parent is a narcissist, it could make the proceedings difficult.

When individuals are considered narcissistic, they usually think very highly of themselves, diminish others to make themselves look better, lack empathy and have a sense of entitlement. These personality traits may have triggered the need for divorce in the first place. Unfortunately, when it comes to the kids, dealing with a narcissistic parent may make the idea of co-parenting seem impossible, and the narcissist may also attempt to win over the kids, even though he or she may not truly care for the kids' feelings or desires over his or her own.

Narcissistic parents can also cause their children to have low self-esteem, feel considerable stress and lower their confidence. As a result, a parent may feel hesitant to let the narcissist have anything resembling sole or even shared custody. These issues could easily make coming to custody terms difficult.

Most parents want the custody decisions they make to nurture the relationships between the kids and both their parents and keep the children as safe and comfortable as possible. California parents who are dealing with a narcissistic ex may wonder how to go about creating such an agreement. Because understanding options and specific avenues that could benefit such circumstances can be difficult, concerned parties may want to consult with legal counsel.

Source: goodmenproject.com, "The Narcissistic Father During And After Divorce", Feb. 16, 2018

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